Monday, 31 August 2015

RIP IDA – as tactfully as possible, the intensive care team take the family aside and prepare them for the inevitable


No need to say it, it goes without saying, it should be obvious to all but,
just in case it isn't obvious to all,
IDA is dead.

IDA, now known as "GOV.UK Verify (RIP)",
is the Cabinet Office Identity Assurance programme.
And it's dead.


OIX, the intensive care team, is well known to DMossEsq's millions of regular readers but for the rest of you:
Open Identity Exchange UK (OIXUK)

This is the UK arm of a global organisation working directly with governments and the private sector developing solutions and trust for online identity, specifically for the British citizen.

OIX UK works closely with the Cabinet Office on the Identity Assurance Programme.  This is the development of the GOV.UK Verify service.  The identity assurance process can also be applied to other, non government websites where proof of identity is wanted.

The OIX goal is to enable the expansion of online identity services and adoption of new online identity products.

We work as a broker between industries designing, testing and developing pilot projects to test real use cases.  All project results are published for the public in the form of white papers.

OIX UK is open to new members.  Non members are welcome to attend our workshops,  membership is preferred for participation in projects – contact us for further information.
OIX has just published not one but two white papers:
Jointly and severally conveyed, the message is the same – there's no hope, IDA is dead, GOV.UK Verify (RIP).

Sunday, 23 August 2015

iRevolutionaries firing blanks

• "From the super smart @LouiseDowne"
Ben Terrett, Director of Design, GDS
• "it's the narrative we've been lacking
about why it's vital to focus on user …"
Neil Williams, Product Lead, GOV.UK
• "I will be referring people to this often"
Neil Williams again
Two months ago on 22 June 2015 Louise Downe published Good services are verbs, bad services are nouns on the GDS design notes blog. Her point? Apparently "verbs will change the way your service works".

Ms Downe is the Head of Service Design at the Government Digital Service (GDS) and considerable effort was put into divining what she meant. To no avail. It remains unclear what her advice is how to improve the design of government services.

On 6 August 2015 she published Better services with patterns and standards on the main GDS blog. She's talking about Government as a Platform (GaaP) and she's talking about service patterns. What is a service pattern?

Service patterns, she tells us, are "consistent (but not uniform)" standards that "will provide better interoperability between services, meaning that we can more easily join them up across government" and they will give government "a way to know how to provide a particular type of service well". Also, "service patterns will be our instruction manual for using platforms and registers to build better services".

No example of a service pattern is given. What do they look like? How do they promote interoperability? How do they raise standards? How will people learn from them? And what have service patterns got to do with verbs? All the reader knows is that "we’re still working out how the creation and management of a service pattern works" and "there’s still a lot to work out".

Tuesday, 11 August 2015

Groundhog Day

We all woke up in the UK yesterday morning to the Daily Telegraph newspaper, among others, warning us about a ...
Government crackdown on firms employing illegal immigrants

Immigration minister James Brokenshire says the government [is] determined to act against businesses denying work to British nationals and driving down wages

Rogue employers who give jobs to illegal immigrants will be hit with the "full force" of the government machine ministers have warned.

Immigration minister James Brokenshire said the Government was determined to act against businesses which were denying work to British nationals and driving down wages ...
Yesterday was 10 August 2015.